Sunday, November 11, 2018

Introduction to IP access lists

Route XP
Today I am going to talk about the Access lists. An access control list (ACL), with respect to a computer file system, is a list of permissions attached to an object. An ACL specifies which users or system processes are granted access to objects, as well as what operations are allowed on given objects or you can say for each rule we have two conditions and that is Permit or Deny.

Types of Access Lists
There are two categories of access lists: numbered and named.

Fig 1.1- IP access Lists
Numbered Access Lists:-
Numbered access lists are broken down into several ranges, each dedicated
to a specific protocol:

1–99 IP standard access list
100-199 IP extended access list
200-299 Protocol type-code access list
300-399 DECnet access list
400-499 XNS standard access list
500-599 XNS extended access list
600-699 Appletalk access list
700-799 48-bit MAC address access list
800-899 IPX standard access list
900-999 IPX extended access list
1000-1099 IPX SAP access list
1100-1199 Extended 48-bit MAC address access list
1200-1299 IPX summary address access list
1300-1999 IP standard access list (expanded range)
2000-2699 IP extended access list

Named Access Lists:-
Named access lists provide a bit more flexibility. Descriptive names can be
used to identify your access-lists. Additionally, individual lines can be
removed from a named access-list. However, like numbered lists, all new
entries are still added to the bottom of the access list.

There are two common types of named access lists:
IP standard named access lists
IP extended named access lists
Standard IP Access List

Standard IP access-lists are based upon the source host or network IP address, and should be placed closest to the destination network.

Router(config)# access-list 10 deny 172.18.0.0 0.0.255.255 ( Just for an Example)
Router(config)# access-list 10 permit any

To apply Access Lists we have to configure the Access-Group on the Interface. Likewise we are taking the interface serial 0 as a reference.

Router(config)# int s0
Router(config-if)# ip access-group 10 in

To view all IP access lists configured on the router:
Router# show ip access-list

To view what interface an access-list is configured on:

Router# show ip interface
Router# show running-config
Extended IP Access List
access-list [100-199] [permit | deny] [protocol] [source address] [wildcard mask] [destination address] [wildcard mask] [operator [port]] [log]
Router(config)# access-list 101 permit tcp 172.18.0.0 0.0.255.255 host 172.16.10.10 eq 80
Router(config)# access-list 101 deny ip 172.18.0.0 0.0.255.255 172.16.0.0 0.0.255.255
Router(config)# access-list 101 permit ip any any

The above ip address is just taken for the example and don’t have real environment existence.

The first line allows the 172.18.x.x network access only to port 80 on the web server. The second line blocks 172.18.x.x from accessing anything else on the 172.16.x.x network. The third line allows 172.18.x.x access to anything else.
To apply this access list, we would configure the following

Router(config)# int e0
Router(config-if)# ip access-group 101 in

Extended IP Access List Port Operators
In the preceding example, we identified TCP port 80 on a specific host use the following syntax:

Router(config)# access-list 101 permit tcp 172.18.0.0 0.0.255.255 host 172.16.10.10 eq 80

We accomplished this using an operator of eq, which is short for equals. Thus, we are identifying host 172.16.10.10 with a port that equals 80. We can use several other operators for port numbers:
eq        Matches a specific port
gt         Matches all ports greater than the port specified
lt          Matches all ports less than the port specified
neq      Matches all ports except for the port specified
range   Match a specific inclusive range of ports

ICMP Access List
The specific ICMP port that a “ping” uses is echo. To block specific ICMP  parameters, use an extended IP access list. On Router B, we would configure:

Router(config)# access-list 102 deny icmp 172.18.0.0 0.0.255.255 172.16.0.0 0.0.255.255 echo
Router(config)# access-list 102 permit icmp 172.18.0.0 0.0.255.255 172.16.0.0 0.0.255.255
Router(config)# access-list 102 permit ip any any

The first line blocks only ICMP echo requests (pings). The second line allows all other ICMP traffic. The third line allows all other IP traffic.

To apply the access lists on other router, you need to configure the follwing as:-

Router(config)# int e0

Router(config-if)# ip access-group 102 in

Friday, November 9, 2018

H-VPLS basic config and verification

Route XP
H-VPLS basic config and verification

Today I am going to talk about the basic configuration of H-VPLS. The IP addresses in the topology are the loopbacks of the U-PE/N-PE devices. The IP addresses of the Clients are what we expect to look direct connected via the H-VPLS core.

Under normal circumstances I would expect the N-PEs to all be a part of the same ISP BGP AS, and the U-PE boxes to be in different BGP AS’s.  This would require some type of BGP Inter-AS option to extend the LSP between providers. To keep it simple I just configured a single core and enabled MPLS for the label switched path.

Below is the topology for the reference

Fig 1.1- H-VPLS Basic Topology
N-PE7 Router:

NPE peer config:
!
l2vpn vfi context VPLS-10
 vpn id 10
 member 8.8.8.8 encapsulation mpls
 !

U-PE peer config:
!
bridge-domain 10
 member vfi VPLS-10
 member 2.2.2.2 10 encapsulation mpls
 member 1.1.1.1 10 encapsulation mpls
!

N-PE8 Router:
!
l2vpn vfi context VPLS-10
 vpn id 10
 member 7.7.7.7 encapsulation mpls
 !

U-PE peer config:
!
bridge-domain 10
 member vfi VPLS-10
 member 2.2.2.2 10 encapsulation mpls
 member 1.1.1.1 10 encapsulation mpls
!

U-PE1 Router:

Attachment Circuit:
!
interface GigabitEthernet4
 service instance 10 ethernet
  encapsulation dot1q 10
 !

Xconnect config:
!
l2vpn xconnect context XC-10
 member GigabitEthernet4 service-instance 10
 member 8.8.8.8 10 encapsulation mpls group RED priority 9
 member 7.7.7.7 10 encapsulation mpls group RED priority 10
 !

U-PE-2 Router:

Attachment Circuit:
!
interface GigabitEthernet4
 service instance 10 ethernet
  encapsulation dot1q 10
 !

Xconnect config:
 !
l2vpn xconnect context XC-10
 member GigabitEthernet4 service-instance 10
 member 7.7.7.7 10 encapsulation mpls group RED priority 9
 member 8.8.8.8 10 encapsulation mpls group RED priority 10
!

N-PE Output:

NPE-7#sh vfi name VPLS-10
Legend: RT=Route-target, S=Split-horizon, Y=Yes, N=No
VFI name: VPLS-10, state: up, type: multipoint, signaling: LDP
  VPN ID: 10
  Bridge-Domain 10 attachment circuits:
  Neighbors connected via pseudowires:
  Peer Address     VC ID        S
  2.2.2.2          10           N  <<<< Split horizon from N-PE to U-PE is disabled
  1.1.1.1          10           N
  8.8.8.8          10           Y  <<<< Split horizon from N-PE to N-PE is enabled

NPE-7#sh xconn all
Legend:    XC ST=Xconnect State  S1=Segment1 State  S2=Segment2 State
  UP=Up       DN=Down            AD=Admin Down      IA=Inactive
  SB=Standby  HS=Hot Standby     RV=Recovering      NH=No Hardware
XC ST  Segment 1                         S1 Segment 2                         S2
------+---------------------------------+--+---------------------------------+--
UP pri  vfi VPLS-10                      UP mpls 2.2.2.2:10                   UP
SB pri  vfi VPLS-10                      UP mpls 1.1.1.1:10                   SB  <<<<< This Xconnect is in Standby Mode
UP pri  vfi VPLS-10                      UP mpls 8.8.8.8:10                   UP
UP pri   bd 10                           UP  vfi VPLS-10                      UP

We see the above output becaue the prioity on U-PE1 is configured as follows:

 member 8.8.8.8 10 encapsulation mpls group RED priority 9
 member 7.7.7.7 10 encapsulation mpls group RED priority 10

From U-PE1 we will prefer 8.8.8.8 (NPE-8) based on lower priority, so the Xconnect from U-PE1 to N-PE7 is in standby.

U-PE Output:

Here is the output from the U-PE which shows the same behavior as above:
UPE-1#sh xconn all
Legend:    XC ST=Xconnect State  S1=Segment1 State  S2=Segment2 State
  UP=Up       DN=Down            AD=Admin Down      IA=Inactive
  SB=Standby  HS=Hot Standby     RV=Recovering      NH=No Hardware

XC ST  Segment 1                         S1 Segment 2                         S2
------+---------------------------------+--+---------------------------------+--
UP pri   ac Gi4:10(Eth VLAN)             UP mpls 8.8.8.8:10                   UP
IA pri   ac Gi4:10(Eth VLAN)             UP mpls 7.7.7.7:10                   SB


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